STATISTICS

 

ADULTS

  • 1-in-5 women will be raped at some point in their lives(1)
  • 1-in-71 men will be raped at some point in their lives(2)
  • 1-in-2 women will experience sexual violence victimization other than rape(3)
  • 1-in-5 men will experience sexual violence victimization other than rape(4)
  • Only 27% of rape and sexual assaults were reported to law enforcement between 2010 and 2012(5)
  • Rape is the most under-reported crime; 63% of sexual assaults are not reported to police(6)
  • In 8-out-of-10 cases of rape, the victim knew the person who sexually assaulted them(7)
  • 1-in-5 women and 1-in-16 men are sexually assaulted while in college(8)
  • 1-in-3 women and 1-in-4 men have been physically abused by an intimate partner(9)
  • 72% of all murder-suicides involve an intimate partner and 94% of the victims of these murder-suicides are female(10)

MINORS

  • Nearly 80% of female victims of rape were first raped before they were 25-years-old; 40% were raped before the age of 18(11)
  • 1-in-4 girls and 1-in-6 boys will be sexually abused before they turn 18-years-old(12)
  • 34% of people who sexually abuse a child are family members(13)
  • Only 12% of child sexual abuse is reported to authorities(14)

SOURCES

[1] Black, M.C., Basile, K.C., Breiding, M.J., Smith, S.G., Walters, M.L., Merrick, M.T. . . . Stevens, M.R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Summary Report. Retrieved from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pdf/NISVS_Report2010-a.pdf

[2] Ibid.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Bureau of Justice Statistics, Percent of Rape/Sexual Assaults by Reporting to the Police, 2010-2012, generated using the NCVS Victimization Analysis Tool, accessed July 6, 2014: http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=nvat

[6] Rennison, C.A. (2002). Rape and sexual assault: Reporting to police and medical attention, 1992-2000 [NCJ 194530]. Retrieved from the US Dept of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics

[7] Miller, T.R., Cohen, M.A., & Wiersema, B. (1996). Victim costs and consequences: A new look (NCJ 155282). Retrieved from the US Dept of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/victcost.pdf

[8] Krebs, C.P., Lindquist, C., Warner, T., Fisher, B., & Martin, S. (2007). The campus sexual assault (CSA) study: Final report. Retrieved from the National Criminal Justice Reference Service: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/221153.pdf

[9] Black, M.C., Basile, K.C., Breiding, M.J., Smith, S.G., Walters, M.L., Merrick, M.T. . . . Stevens, M.R. (2011). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Summary Report. Retrieved from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pdf/NISVS_Report2010-a.pdf

[10] Violence Policy Center. (2012). American Roulette: Murder-Suicide in the United States. Retrieved from: http://www.vpc.org/studies/amroul2012.pdf

[11] Matthew J. Breiding, et al., Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization-National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011 (Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, 2014), pg 11: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6308.pdf

[12] Finkelhor, D., Hotaling, G., Lewis, I.A., and Smith, C. (1990). Sexual abuse in a national survey of adult men and women: Prevalence, characteristics and risk factors. Child Abuse & Neglect 14, 19-28. Doi:10.1016/0145-2134(90)90077-7

[13] National Sexual Violence Resource Center. (2011). Child Sexual Abuse Prevention: Overview.

[14] Hanson, R.F., Resnick, H.F., Saunders, B.E., Kilpatrick, D.G., & Best, C. (1999). Factors related to the reporting of child rape. Child Abuse and Neglect, 23, 559-569. Doi:10.1016/S0145-2134(99)00028-9

STUDIES

 

Feminism & Psychology, May 2016 (http://fap.sagepub.com/content/26/2.toc)

  • The Importance of self-defense training for sexual violence prevention (Jocelyn A. Hollander)

 

The New England Journal of Medicine

Special Article: Efficacy of a Sexual Assault Resistance Program for University Women, June 11, 2015

(http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1411131#t=article)


 

Violence Against Women, An International and Interdisciplinary Journal

Special Issue: Self-Defense Against Sexual Assault

Volume 20, Number 3, March 2014 (http://vaw.sagepub.com/content/20/3.toc)

Included in this issue:

  • Does Self-Defense Training Prevent Sexual Violence Against Women? (Jocelyn A. Hollander)
  • Resisting Rape: The Effects of Victim Self-Protection on Rape Completion and Injury (Jongyeon Tark & Gary Kleck)
  • Self-Defense Training as Clinical Intervention for Survivors of Trauma (Gianine D. Rosenblum & Lynn S. Taska)
  • Exploring the Intersection of Race and Gender in Self-Defense Training (Lisa Speidel)
  • The Group Dynamics of Women’s Self-Defense Training (Leanne R. Brecklin & Rena K. Middendorf)
  • Reflections on Researching Rape Resistance (Sarah E. Ullman)
  • Empowering Self-Defense Training (Martha E. Thompson)
  • Self-Defense or Undermining the Self? Exploring the Possibilities and Limitations of a Novel Anti-Rape Technology (Deborah White & Gethin Rees)
  • From Gun Politics to Self-Defense Politics: A Feminist Critique of the Great Gun Debate (Jennifer D. Carlson)

 

Violence Against Women, An International and Interdisciplinary Journal

Volume 15, Number 5, May 2009 (http://vaw.sagepub.com/content/15/5.toc)

The Roots of Resistance to Women’s Self-Defense (Jocelyn A. Hollander)